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. this would give the right signals on energy sources and use. it could raise money to reduce the deficit, restore our infrastructure, speed and finance conservation. there are a number of other commonsense steps that would make progress on carbon pollution and energy conservation goals more significant. the epa should stop dragging its feet permitting old coal plants to continue to spew forth toxic waste, harming the environment and the health of our citizens. it is past time the clean air act reinforced. make sure there are proper safeguards for the cracking technology. make sure this reservoir of inexpensive gas does not undercut the addition of renewables to our energy portfolio. solar, wind, geothermal. dership on these technologies for a balanced energy portfolio and ultimately to reduce our carbon footprint. at each step, we should be looking to enhance energy conservation, because the cheapest kilowatt hour is one that you don't have to generate. we should have a 10-year glide path in support of renewable energy. the wind energy industry has already signaled its reaccept tift just
into the deficit and pay off the debt. >> you know what i didn't like today. i thought it was annoying, he may have to slow down social security payments if-- and tell you why, there's never any suggestion maybe congress shouldn't be paid salaries, the senate not be paid salaries, the president not be paid salaries, cut down on air force one. your constituent payment to go home on commercial aircraft, instead stay here and save money on travel and get the job done. there's any discussion of the politicians to take the hit it's the social security recipients. >> he wants to use the military paycheck to try to scare people and hurt the elderly. you don't have to do that, there's revenue to the treasury on a daily basis. the problem is we deficit spend about 3 to 4 billion dollars a day. we collect, we spend about 10 billion a day and that means that we deficit. we have to borrow 3 to 4 billion dollars a day. we spend more than 700 million dollars a day in interest on a national debt. there are lots of things to do. the president has lots of discretion to curb back that spending to make sure that soci
, we understand what's going on in the debt and deficit and destruction but we have a bunch of debt deniers right now other in the senate that, look, this -- this debt devastate -- devastation that's coming is coming. do we have an obligation to try to find a way to actually get a piece of legislation all the way to the president's desk where we get to start to bend the curve? something beyond the messaging bill to actually an accomplishment. and that's -- and that's going to be the battle. >> you asked if this is a test of the relevance of the conservatives in the conference. i would say that really, most conservatives are willing to suspend disbelief and trust the leadership right now that we'll have a conservative outcome after the last three months. it's really a test of this new pact, if you will, of leadership to get to a 10-year balanced budget, to hold the c.r. at 974. we'll see if those things come to pass. i certainly hope they do. but i would submit to you it's more of a test of what the leadership is going to do than it is of the conservative element. >> i would say it's
can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and certainly not because seniors currently benefiting from them don't deserve with they've been promised. because real leadership isn't about making the easy choice, it's about maybing the right choice. social
in an administration, did any of the deficit deals that we did, were those occurring at the same time as debt ceiling raises? >> they all do. >> we've heard that that -- i'm not going to accept that, not going to do it, not the way it's done. we're not a banana republic. how many can you recall, deficit deals were affected? it's something that's done, is it not? >> standard operating procedure. we all learned about the power of the purse of democracy. back then, it used to be taxes because they couldn't borrow. now, you can borrow. taxes aren't the only strains what government can spend. the parliament and congress has to be able to control the borrowing level. that's government 101. >> is zit in g-- dis in geingeny we've already been to the restaurant and trying to stiff the bill? it wasn't the $800 stimulus or any of the things the president's done, it's congress? >> first, you're raising debt limits to cover future spending. fact one is the money hasn't been spent yet. that's not true. >> it's sort of disassembling. >> that's a good word for it. the second fact is congress hasn't approved the mone
on the table. >> ironically would probably increase our deficit. it is absurd. >> the president won't back down on the debt ceiling or on gun safety. >> the pressing issue of gun reform. >> exactly one month after the tragedy at sandy hook. >> if there is a step we can take that will save even one child we should take that step. >> gun violence continues to wreak its deadly toll each day. >> this is a moment to act. >> congress is incapable of passing an assault weapon ban. >> everybody is totally upset by it. >> what makes sense? what works? >> this is a moment to act. >> this is a promise to turn the conversation into actions. >> if there is a step we can take that will save even one child, we should take that step. >> the lecturer in chief returns to the east room of the white house today to explain something to congressional republicans that previous presidents have not had to explain to congress. >> i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay fo
relief insurance fund. okay? we know that that has been operating at a deficit. it's still in the red right now. this is going to prolong the agony. if we don't fix the core spending problem, we are not going to have money for another disaster. >> neil: i suspect they won't. they have taken some of the fat out. but i am talking in terms of million, not billions. >> million, not billions. >> neil: by the end of tonight, they will have gotten the sandy package out. you fear it's a continuing precedent for spending bad money after good. >> it's the nature of the device they are using to do t. emergency spending and including in emergency spending line-item spending -- want the way it's supposed to be done. we know the government takes in "x" number of dollars and it's lg willing to borrow "x" number of dollars, for the ceiling. for every $6 of $steb, it's borrowed money! we are spending less than we are taking in in revenue. at this point, that comes home to haunt you. i am saying the victims didn't nide the money, we don't need to spend $16 billion on things that don't have to do with v
in the economy. they worry about interest rates going up and they worry about the impact on our deficit. because when interest rates go up, that means the deficit will go up. so we make the problem worse by taking this route if we go down this pathway. >> i want to throw three terms at you that we've had to stomach out in america. debate over the fiscal cliff, the debate over the debt ceiling and the budget show dunn. all three of these very serious. but which is the most serious. >> the debt ceiling could do damage to our countries for decades to come if we hit it and don't expect the problem. this is the most dangerous thing. this is almost a nuclear option. this is really playing with very dangerous things. and one little mistake could be devastating to our country. >> and yet you still come on day after day and smile with me. thank you. always good to see you. >>> by the way, i just want to remind you if you're doing the math, the treasury says it might come up short in its payments as soon as february 15th. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it wort
up 4 consecutive trillion-dollar federal budget deficits in his first term. he has an economy that is not being returned to prosperity. 23 million people still unemployed. we have, i think bill. i think if i may. you undersell folks just a little bit in that i think everybody is smart enough to know there is is a problem. i think everybody is pretty much smart enough to know that we have got to come up with a solution. when you have a national media part of this coalition of interest and depen dense on the democratic party, there is no way for them to have validation. there is no way for them to have an aggressive watchdog that would normally, traditionally, historically be attacking the miss adventure of those in power. >> we agree that the media is in the tank. i'm almost stunned that you think, to quote you, everybody understands the issue. i will tell you why, you go right outside the fox news channel building now and you stop people and go what about the federal debt? come on. >> let me put it in some context. there was a time in this country and everybody may be slightly
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
. it's more to do about where we are in time right now. we didn't have a deficit and debt crisis the way we do right now. let's be fair about the facts. we are in a debt crisis. however, when something like this happens, it's an exception to the rule. these people are hurting. they need the help of the federal government, and that's what we're going to deliver today. the bottom line is we're going to move forward and get this done. >> you know, i have been blessed to get to know some of the really good people up in your borough like taddy atlas and your borough president. they're doing great work. tell us how bad it is. we're looking at pictures of the people under water during the flood. i saw some of that stuff on your own island of staten island a couple weeks ago, it was really rough. >> it's horrendous. this is a war zone. let me be clear, don't forget about -- you see homes crushed. you see people's personal belongings wiped out to sea, but there's also emotional scars that you cannot see. just this past weekend i had a mother tell me her children are deathly afraid when it
't create new deficit spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family that's trying to improve its credit rating. families that say, i know how we can save money, we won't pay her credit card bills. it was the sole solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 in the u.s. downgraded last time. so all these issues are important and it's very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in a deal, it certainly went part way, but leaves a number of issues still on the table. would you care to raise that as an additional fiscal cliff that is facing us? would you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raise that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff, if it is allowed to take place, it probably would have traded a recession this year. a good bit of that has been addressed. nevertheless, we still have fairly restrictive fiscal policies now. it is estimated that fed
in the late 1980's when we didn't have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the deficit was only $3 trillion. but we've so badly mismanaged our money after that, by the time we got to hurricane katrina in 2005, that we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster relief and paid for and offset about 40% of it. but we didn't learn. we didn't learn from those mistakes and we've continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a point now where we're at $16 trillion today and it's incumbent upon us to have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this. and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it. i wish very much that we weren't here today. i wish very much that we could pass this and easily borrow the money, without any questions whatsoever. but we've wasted that opportunity. we've mismanaged our own finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care of our own. think about that for a second. in the united states of america we do not have enough money to take care of our own c
deficit hawk. the republican senate committee budget guru, and he is offsetting most of the first slice. the bill's actually two pieces, 17 billion and 34 billion. and he's offsetting the 17 billion portion with a across-the-board cut. so it'll be interesting to see if that passes or not. you know, all democrats will vote against it, and i suspect that it will fail. but it'll be interesting to see. for him it's important because they want to establish the principle that emergency spending needs to be offset with spending cuts. which is something that democrats are very afraid of, because they feel like every time there's a disaster, republicans use it as an excuse to go after domestic programs, social services and so forth. so that'll be an important precedent, and then we'll see what happens in the senate. you know, we'll probably see a house/senate conference on the bill or some ping-ponging between the chambers and probably delaying final enactment. >> host: yeah. and the washington times reporting this morning that the conservative group for growth is threatening to punish members w
out of our current deficit and debt. i was encouraged to hear that senator schumer and our colleagues in the senate are going to do something they are very unfamiliar with, which is actually to pass a budget. i will believe it when i see it. he says they're going to do it. that is important because when you have to put pen to paper and list your priorities it makes it easier to have the debate. when you're debating against a phrase like balanced approach, that's a challenge. but when you're debating against specific numbers, it gets a little easier. tracy: representative schakowsky, let's talk about this budget. the house of course calling no budget, no pay. look, you want to talk about the center and the american people. we have all had to create budgets over the last couple of years and had no choice but to live by them. we don't have printing presses at home. this notion that we don't have a budget right now, a little disheartening. you think we'll get one out of all this. >> the house passed a budget, the ryan budget that would decimate many things that the middle class actually d
this. yes, it may run up the immediate deficit, but once again, for every dollar that we invest in those levees we not only save lives and property, but we put people to work and we get the economic engine going. further up in my district, again, along the sacramento and the rivers, i have a project that's 44 miles of levee that clearly will fail. it has failed four times in the last 60 years. lives have been lost. one of the most catastrophic failures of a levee happened in this stretch of river. we need to rebuild that. the federal government's role in these construction projects of these levees has gone back to the very beginning of this nation and it is congress' task to allocate the money to decide the projects that are going to be built. but unfortunately we tied ourselves in knots here with certain rules that have been put in by our republican colleagues that prevent us from taking the necessary action to protect our communities. we're not talking about, you know, willy nily unnecessary projects. we're talking about saving -- nilly unnecessary projects. we're talking abou
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is
, we reduce the federal deficit. >> i thank the gentleman. i yield back, mr. chairman. >> i don't have any question. i support the gentleman's amendment over all. >> thank you very much. >> mr. woodall? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i would ask the gentleman because i know he's speaking on behalf of the his constituents when you bring -- when he brings this amendment, but the size of this package, larger than many and how appropriation bills, $60 billion. that's larger than homeland security appropriations bill that mr. king authorizes. that's larger than the financial services appropriations bill. that's larger than the state department foreign operations appropriations bill, and these are all built with which this congress deliberates vermont's. hearing -- four months. he was committed to making sure your folks get those things that they need, hearing the priority that if one has laid out knowing that these are not optional things that are needed, these are mandatory things that are needed. these are items that new jersey and new york will absolutely bring to fruition. these tunnels ar
they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let a
of health care and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [ cheers ] for we remember the lessons of our past when twilight years were spent in poverty and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the few. we rec noise that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these do not staff our initiative, they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ cheers and applause ] we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to ourselves but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would be
to look at the children's future in terms of economic debt and economic slavery through great deficits. >> steve: let's hope you're right and they get some things done. they compromise this time. >> exciting day. >> steve: it is indeed. thank you. next up, once a thing seen only in movies, drones are now revolutionizing warfare. inside look like you've never seen before. that's so cool. first, let's check in with bill hemmer who is live and chilly in d.c hey, billy. >> not too bad just yet. good morning to you. the next two hours we are live on the road here right across from the white house on pennsylvania avenue looking toward where america is today and what are the expectations for a second term? joe trippi is our guest on the democratic side. karl rove on the republican side. brit hume will analyze this as only he can when our coverage continues live at the top of the hour with martha and me on america's news room. we will see you then. so much to cover, so many important topics. we will get to as many as possible in the next two hours. we'll see you then ♪ just one bite opens a
. the problem is if you'd inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put out a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to get out of that, and it is difficult for or organizations to think about releasing the information before it is out for. -- asked for. i have been involved in several situations where the information was available and understandable. it mitigated some concerns. it was difficult to make that transparent, and catching up with that is really difficult. one reason for the impact was the lack of information as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. as a context for moving beyond the research done, what do you think the larger research agenda ought to be about? >> the hydrocarbons in the continental shelf and inland areas are pretty well known. it is the deep sea we did not have information for. i think the deep sea ecosystem is an area we need to emphasize, and some of the longer living organisms such as marine mammals. one of the issues is the effect of multiple stressors. we have some smart jury is that were heavily oiled, and s
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)